Image Library: Views and buildings

The view today across Boston Haven to the fields of Toft and Scrane. Photo copyright Tormod Amundsen of biotope.no.
The view across Boston Haven to the fields of Toft and Scrane. In the 1100s much of this land was still marshland, as Frampton Marsh in the foreground still is today. Ralph of Fenne and the Rochfords did much to reclaim and develop the area over hundreds of years. Photo copyright Tormod Amundsen of biotope.no.
Caerlaverock Castle, by Roland Hanbury (CC-BY-SA-4.0)
Caerlaverock Castle in Dumfries, Scotland. Sir Ralph de Rochford II was probably at the siege of this castle in 1300. Photo by Roland Hanbury (CC-BY-SA-4.0).
The great keep of Kenilworth Castle, by Dave, Flickr (CC-BY-SA-2.0).
The great keep of Kenilworth Castle, where Sayer de Rochford was based in the 1320s, probably as a retainer of the rebel earl Thomas of Lancaster. Sayer was later imprisoned here too, while his wife Elizabeth retreated to the nearby priory for safety. Photo by Dave, Flickr (CC-BY-SA-2.0).
Old St Mark's, Lincoln, by Samuel Hieronymus Grimm, 1784
The ruins of the old St Mark’s church in Lincoln, which once had arms of Sayer de Rochford and his wife Joan Hillary in the east window. Nothing survives of this church today. By Samuel Hieronymus Grimm, 1784. Copyright The British Library Board.
Somerton Castle, Lincolnshire, by Samuel Buck
The remains of Somerton Castle, Lincolnshire, in the early 1700s. Sir Sayer was entrusted to keep the captured king of France here in 1359, and in the next century his grandson, Sir Ralph III, was given the castle for life by Henry V. Engraving by Samuel Buck, c1726-1739, via www.albion-prints.com.
The Guildhall, Boston, about 1820
The Guildhall in Boston, built in the 1390s by John de Rochford the Younger and his associates for their newly-incorporated Guild of St Mary. This building still stands today. Copperplate about 1820, from Pishey Thompson’s Collections for a Topographical and Historical Account of Boston
The city of Lincoln in a hand-coloured engraving of 1779
The city of Lincoln in a hand-coloured engraving of 1779. The city probably looked much the same in the Rochfords’ time. Shortly before he died in 1410, Sir John de Rochford the Younger was appointed keeper of Lincoln Castle, which can be seen here on the hill to the left of the cathedral.
Stoke Rochford church - photo copyright Jinjabird Photography, www.jinjabird.com
Stoke Rochford church. The large window to the left is the south chapel, built in memory of Sir Ralph Rochford III and his wife Margaret in 1448. The window to the right is in the north chapel, built around the 1470s for his son Henry Rochford of Fenne. The central window is in the chancel above the alter. These and the other windows were once full of stained glass memorials to the Rochfords. Photo copyright Jinjabird Photography.
Rochester Castle in Kent, by llamnudds, Flickr (CC-BY-SA-2.0)
Rochester Castle in Kent. When Henry VI became king in 1422, the new regime gave Sir Ralph III the keeping of this castle and town for seven years. Photo by llamnudds, Flickr (CC-BY-SA-2.0).
Rochford Tower, Fenne, from The Antiquarian and Topographical Cabinet, volume 5
Rochford Tower in Fenne, built by Henry Rochford of Fenne around 1460. In this picture of about 1818 the rest of the manor house can still be seen to the right, but only the tower itself is still standing today. Etching from The Antiquarian and Topographical Cabinet, volume 5.
Engraving of Rochford Tower, Fenne, c1821
Rochford Tower, Fenne, around 1821. Engraving from the Gentleman’s Magazine, v91 part 2 (where it was erroneously called the Kyme Tower).
Rochford Tower by Edwin Whitefield, 1889
Rochford Tower by Edwin Whitefield, 1889, from Homes of Our Forefathers in Boston, Old England, and Boston, New England
Rochford Tower, Fenne. Photo copyright Shane Bradshaw, all rights reserved.
Rochford Tower, built by the Rochfords around 1460 as part of their main residence at Fenne. Photo copyright Shane Bradshaw, all rights reserved.
Thurland Hall, from James Orange’s History of Nottingham, 1840
Thurland Hall in Nottingham, built around 1458 by John Rochford IV’s grandfather Thomas Thurland. Thurland was the wealthiest merchant in Nottingham, and also served as an MP, mayor and justice for the city. Engraving for James Orange’s History of Nottingham, 1840. The building has since been replaced.
Haughton Park, Nottinghamshire, by Johannes Kip, 1707
Haughton Park in Nottinghamshire. The park itself was created by Edward Stanhope around 1509 after he retrieved the property from his cousins. Joan Rochford probably lived here with her husband Henry Stanhope in the late 1400s. The chapel where she was buried can be seen to the right. Engraving by Johannes Kip, 1707. Copyright UK Government Art Collection.
Detail of Kip’s 1709 engraving of Haughton Park showing Haughton chapel
Detail of Kip’s 1709 engraving of Haughton Park showing Haughton chapel as it was then. Copyright UK Government Art Collection.
The ruins of Haughton chapel today, by Richard Guthrie
The ruins of Haughton chapel today – almost nothing survives. Photo by Richard Guthrie, via British Listed Buildings.

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